Hoosier Cancer Research Network on Facebook

Hoosier Cancer Research Network on Facebook

OnCore Login
Login to Oncore Network

Login to Oncore Network

Hoosier Cancer Research Network on Facebook

Hoosier Cancer Research Network on Facebook

Award advances retrospective analysis of HCRN LUN14-179

Investigators working on the HCRN LUN14-179 study, which involved the use of concurrent chemoradiation with consolidation pembrolizumab for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer, anticipated that some patients would experience pneumonitis. But they did not know which of their patients might be more susceptible than others.

To learn more about the rates of pneumonitis among study participants, and whether biomarkers could be identified that might predict whether a patient might be more susceptible, researchers at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center launched a retrospective analysis of the study data.

The initial analysis was conducted by Nasser Hanna, MD and Greg Durm, MD. Dr. Durm presented initial data on pneumonitis rates and timing in the HCRN LUN14-179 study as well as the feasibility of giving patients consolidation immunotherapy at the 2017 Young Investigators Forum in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in Atlanta, Ga. Dr. Durm was one of just two investigators to be awarded a $10,000 grant during the meeting. The award will further Indiana University’s research on pneumonitis in non-small cell lung cancer, and it made possible a retrospective analysis of the LUN14-179 trial led by Shahid Ahmed, MD in cooperation with Dr. Hanna and Dr. Durm.

“We looked back at a number of factors, including clinical, radiation dosing, and then we did some genomic analysis from a limited number of samples from that to see if we could find biomarkers that would predict pneumonitis rates,” Dr. Durm said. “It was mostly a hypothesis-generating study, but we did find some very interesting things we think will be useful in upcoming studies.

“If we can predict if a particular patient is at high risk for developing pneumonitis, then we can avoid treating that patient, or at least be more vigilant of signs or symptoms of pneumonitis in him or her,” Dr. Durm continued. “If we can predict how likely that patient is to respond and compare that to the risk of getting pneumonitis, we can better counsel them about whether it is going to be a better treatment or not.”

Dr. Durm previously received the 2014 George and Sarah Jane Fisher Young Investigator Award from HCRN. He is the sponsor-investigator of two Big Ten Cancer Research Consortium studies: BTCRC-LUN15-029, and BTCRC-LUN16-081.

About Hoosier Cancer Research Network:

Hoosier Cancer Research Network (formerly known as Hoosier Oncology Group) conducts innovative cancer research in partnership with academic and community physicians and scientists across the United States and internationally. The organization provides comprehensive clinical trial management and support, from conception through publication. Created in 1984 as a program of the Walther Cancer Institute, Hoosier Cancer Research Network became an independent nonprofit clinical research organization in 2007. Since its founding, Hoosier Cancer Research Network has initiated more than 160 trials in a variety of cancer types and supportive care, resulting in more than 350 publications. More than 5,000 subjects have participated in Hoosier Cancer Research Network clinical trials.